A,  Fiction,  MG,  Nonfiction,  YA

Eva Reads About WWI, Installment #8

Installment #1 * Installment #2 * Installment #3 * Installment #4 *

Installment #5 * Installment #6 * Installment #7

Note on my star rating system:

5 stars=Amazing, have read more than once or definitely will read again, highly recommend.

4 stars=Excellent, may not ever re-read but the quality was superb and highly recommend.

3 stars=Good, a solid read.

2 stars= Just okay, not that impressed, but also not horrible, and probably I will forget all about it soon.

1 star=The only reason I finished reading this was so I could rant/snark/complain about it 100% fairly

To End All Wars

(Adam Hochschild) ★★★★

I enjoyed this one so thoroughly. It looked at WWI from an angle I haven’t seen addressed in any other book and dealt with the conscientious objectors, women, people who opposed the war, and such like. Highly recommend.

Come On In, America

(Lisa Barrett Osborne) ★★★

This was a great overview of America’s part in the war. I love YA history books. So many pictures and quick to read.

A Star for Mrs Blake

(April Smith) ★★

This was kind of blah. The premise was interesting–the story of the Gold Star Mothers, about whom I’d never heard–but there were so many characters and plots going on and I wished that the author would have focused more exclusively on say 4 characters than 10 or whatever it was and fleshed them out more. It wasn’t a terrible book, it just felt like it had too much going on for too many characters, a number of whom I didn’t really care about.

The Skylarks’ War (Love to Everyone)

(Hilary McKay) ★★★★★

I CANNOT SAY ENOUGH GOOD THINGS ABOUT THIS BOOK LET ME SCREAM ABOUT IT IN ALL CAPS WILL THAT DO???

NO???

Okay, so I love Hilary McKay, full stop. I’ve been excited about this book ever since I heard it was coming out and have read it twice already – first an ARC, then the UK version that I bought. I love the characters, I love the story, I love McKay’s dry quirky sense of humour, and the way she manages to write for kids (my 6 and 9 year olds enjoyed sitting in to listen when I was reading this over the phone to a friend) whilst maintaining a depth that bears many re-readings.

I just want to be McKay when I grow up, thank you for coming to my TED talk.

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